4-8-2 SLSF 1520

Discussion in '1500 Class Mountains' started by fluff, Dec 12, 2010.

  1. fluff

    fluff Member

    Who likes, or dislikes the bigger tender tank on 4-8-2 SLSF 1520?

    I think it looks better, more balanced look. we all know this took place because of an altercation with one of the 4200s. I did not know the engine ever had the bigger smokebox door, but it did.

    I assume after the wreck she received the smaller door.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 7, 2024
  2. frisco1522

    frisco1522 Staff Member Staff Member

    4-8-2 SLSF 1528 also had the bigger tender, again from being in a wreck.

    I never cared for them, but it is an acquired taste I guess.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 7, 2024
  3. Karl

    Karl 2008 Engineer of the Year Frisco.org Supporter

    Did not stream-styled 4-8-2 SLSF 1503's tender have a different look too? It may have just been a sheet metal fa├žade.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2024
  4. frisco1522

    frisco1522 Staff Member Staff Member

    I think it was just built up sides, kinda like the Firefly engines.

    Without looking at pictures, I think the 4-8-2 SLSF 1520 and SLSF 1528 were welded bodies.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 7, 2024
  5. TAG1014 (Tom Galbraith RIP 7/15/2020)

    TAG1014 (Tom Galbraith RIP 7/15/2020) Passed Away July 15, 2020 Frisco.org Supporter

    I began to like the 4-8-2 SLSF 1520's tender from the great Preston George photograph of the Meteor on the S-curve, page 167 of Frisco Power!

    Tom
     
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  6. fluff

    fluff Member

    Yep, that is where I first saw it.

    Great book.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 7, 2024
  7. gbmott

    gbmott Member

    I have to vote with Don.

    Balance is an individual judgement call. To my eye the tenders with which the 1500s were delivered were perfectly "balanced" for the locomotive. What I would have really liked to see would have been one of the larger tenders behind an oil-burning 4-8-2 4400.

    Those tenders I always thought seemed too small, though maybe it was just that they rode on 4-wheel trucks.

    Gordon
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 7, 2024
  8. klrwhizkid

    klrwhizkid Administrator Staff Member Administrator Frisco.org Supporter

    From Richard Crabtree on Frisco Rails Across Missouri.

    Here is Frisco No. 1520 4-8-2 Mountain Class built by Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1926.

    SLSF 1520 is paralleling U.S. Route 66 with 65 empty oil tank cars during WWII near Sullivan, Missouri.

    Circa 1940.

    Edit: Image posted by Richard Crabtree without permission of owner (frisco1522) has been removed.
    KLR
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 16, 2024
  9. palallin

    palallin Member

    The original black and white photograph is in the book Frisco Power.

    I try to picture just where this photograph was taken every time I go to Sullivan, MO, but I have had no real success.

    I have yet to find the curve where U.S. Route 66 is below the railroad grade.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 16, 2024
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  10. klrwhizkid

    klrwhizkid Administrator Staff Member Administrator Frisco.org Supporter

    There are two spots relatively close to Sullivan that may fit

    The best is just east of Fanning, the other may be just east of Cuba.

    However, I believe that either is too much of a stretch.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 16, 2024
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  11. frisco1522

    frisco1522 Staff Member Staff Member

    I own that negative and did not give permission to publish it on Face Book or here.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 16, 2024
  12. Karl

    Karl 2008 Engineer of the Year Frisco.org Supporter

    Don and I have been kicking this one around

    We like the 3 degree-3 minute curve between MP 223.45 and MP 223.91, which was the first curve east of Holman, MO. The Frisco had a 80-car length passing track at Holman, MO, MP 224.2. I have attached a portion of a 1947, 15 minute topo sheet image.

    Screen Shot 2020-11-20 at 6.11.04 AM.png
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2024
  13. klrwhizkid

    klrwhizkid Administrator Staff Member Administrator Frisco.org Supporter

    I agree, that is the location of the shot.
     
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  14. palallin

    palallin Member

    Where is Holman?
     
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  15. klrwhizkid

    klrwhizkid Administrator Staff Member Administrator Frisco.org Supporter

    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 16, 2024
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  16. gstout

    gstout Member Frisco.org Supporter

    And yet here it was.

    There is also a George Strombeck photograph on that site that George did not give permission to use.

    GS
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 16, 2024
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  17. palallin

    palallin Member

    That location is not "near Sullivan."

    Either Joe Collias was wrong, or we are looking at a different location.
     
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  18. klrwhizkid

    klrwhizkid Administrator Staff Member Administrator Frisco.org Supporter

    Steven, that is true; it is not near Sullivan, MO, MP 68.1, on the Rolla Subdivision.

    I think that Don, Karl and I are in agreement that Joe Collias was mistaken about the location.
     
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  19. Karl

    Karl 2008 Engineer of the Year Frisco.org Supporter

    As noted in your first post, you have not found a matching location in the Sullivan area. That would necessitated an expanded search area. After looking at period USGS topographic sheets, Frisco track charts, Frisco curve records, and the Frisco pole line book, the curve MP 223+18 - MP 223+37-1/2 east Holman, MO, which is most definitely not near Sullivan, MO, would seem to be the most likely candidate for the photograph location.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2024
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  20. meteor910

    meteor910 2009 Engineer of the Year Staff Member Frisco.org Supporter

    It is easy for an author to make a few errors in a book manuscript, in particular a book on a topic the author knows more about than those who might proof read it.

    For example, Joe erred on page 157, where he noted 4-8-2 SLSF 1501 was on display in Cuba, MO. I was with him at Tinkertown Hobby Shop one day shortly after he gave me my copy of Frisco Power.

    I gave him a bit of good natured grief over the location of SLSF 1501. He said, "give me a piece of tablet paper from the shop", on which he wrote in big black letters "Rolla, dammit, Rolla!" and gave it to me. We all had a good laugh over it.

    I still have that paper in my copy of the book on page 157.

    No problem, Joe - you fixed it.

    K
     
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