SLSF 4-6-0's 506-515

Discussion in '4-6-0 Ten Wheeler' started by Coonskin, Jan 28, 2011.

  1. Coonskin

    Coonskin Member

    Looking for any additional information on, and pictures of, the Frisco's 506-515 series of Ten Wheelers.

    What I have so far:

    Original No's: 146-155

    Built: 1893

    Erecting Shops: Pittsburg

    Original RR: KCFS&M

    Cylinder Size: 19x26

    Boiler Pressure: 160

    Tractive Effort: 22400

    Weight: 198100

    Does anyone have any drawings of this class? I am hoping to construct a V scale model of this class of Frisco Ten Wheeler.

    Thank you very much for any input.

    Andre Ming
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Karl

    Karl 2008 Engineer of the Year Frisco.org Supporter

    I may have some diagrams. I am in Brooklyn at the moment, but will check when I return to Houston.
     
  3. meteor910

    meteor910 2009 Engineer of the Year Staff Member Frisco.org Supporter

    I'm sure Karl has this as well, but I do have a diagram of the 506-515 4-6-0's from the 1904 Frisco locomotive diagram book. I'll scan one and post it later today when I have a moment.

    Ken
     
  4. meteor910

    meteor910 2009 Engineer of the Year Staff Member Frisco.org Supporter

    Here 'tis: SLSF 506-515, 4-6-0's, from the 1904 Frisco locomotive diagram book.

    Ken
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Coonskin

    Coonskin Member

    THANK YOU!

    That may be enough to get started once I get my new CAD program up and going.

    Karl: If you have a different one than Ken shared... I'm in for it too!!

    Ken: If you have more of these, would you be willing to share at a later date if I can determine what typical classes operated in my area? (Assuming you have a match for said engines.)

    The TOC19 era can often be a tough era to find good data concerning. Drawings such as these will help a lot.


    Andre Ming
     
  6. meteor910

    meteor910 2009 Engineer of the Year Staff Member Frisco.org Supporter

    Andre - Glad to be of help!

    I have the entire 1904 Frisco diagram book. I believe Karl and Don also have it. If you have other numbers, just ask. Within reason, we'll get 'em posted.

    I also have a Frisco June, 1904 locomotive roster listing each engine number with data. It's big! I don't think there is much on this listing that is not on the diagram, but I'll find the page for the 506-515 and post it as well just to be sure.

    Ken

    ps - Your old GP7's run well with the newer Atlas units!
     
  7. meteor910

    meteor910 2009 Engineer of the Year Staff Member Frisco.org Supporter

    Andre - Here's the roster sheet for SLSF 506-515 4-6-0's. It doesn't show much more than the diagram.

    Note 58 reads: "Tender Capacity 7 tons coal, 3500 gals water, were KCFS&M."

    Ken
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 29, 2011
  8. Coonskin

    Coonskin Member

    Thanks for the roster sheet, Ken!

    Did you notice the roster sheet data is at variance with the drawing? To wit: On the drawing the tender capacity is listed as 7 tons of coal and 3500 gals of water. Weird. I note the tractive effort isn't listed on the sheet either, that is a very important spec when creating a V scale engine, for you want the V scale model to pull what the prototype did. Fortunately, the TE spec was listed on the roster I used for my original post.

    Amazing how sometimes finding an answer raises more questions!

    For sure, though, thanks to the efforts above, I already have a lot more info than when I first posted my plea!

    Andre
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 29, 2011
  9. meteor910

    meteor910 2009 Engineer of the Year Staff Member Frisco.org Supporter

    Andre -

    Well, the main problem here is that I am a totally incompetent typist!

    Note 58 really reads: "Tender Capacity 7 tons coal, 3500 gals water, were KCFS&M".

    What I gave you above was Note 59. I'll fix it.

    Sorry about that!

    Ken
     
  10. meteor910

    meteor910 2009 Engineer of the Year Staff Member Frisco.org Supporter

    Andre - There is a good R. J. Foster shot of SLSF 507 in Joe Collias' Frisco Power, page 105.

    K
     
  11. Coonskin

    Coonskin Member

    Yep... I've seen that one. Though it has been heavily modernized, it still helps with proportions/etc. I had forgotten about it, so thanks for the heads-up.

    The pic of 446 on the same page is also a nice looking Ten Wheeler. Aside from the new compressor, turbo, and possibly the stack, probably looks about like it would have in my 1905-1908 era.

    My target era is a toughie, possibly the worst of the lot in era's. Very small range of years with lots of transition taking place. Modern Steam freaks have it the best. More photos and data available. For the 19th Century guys, seems there's builder's photos and other builder's type data available... though not heavy in general pictures, at least not that I've unearthed in my searches. I would model the link n' pin 1890's in a heartbeat, but I would lose SO MUCH operating potential on account of the Midland Valley, Arkansas Central, and Fort Smith & Western weren't up and running yet.

    You gotta' love this research 'n stuff. Very fun.

    EDIT: Oops. Corrections: The Arkansas Central was chartered and began construction in 1897. The Fort Smith & Western began construction in 1899. Still though, modeling the early 1890's would give up some interchange at distant points, as well as Fort Smith. Tempting, though.

    Andre
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 29, 2011
  12. John Sanders

    John Sanders Member

    Andre,
    Attached is a drawing of a similar Vandalia Line ten wheeler. The dimensions are missing, but you can scale the engine from the wheel base dimension listed in the text. Also attached is a photo of Frisco 487 (487 to 490 class) shot in Monett in 1912. Diagrams show 63" driver diameter instead of 57" and a slightly different wheel base. Frisco had modified the wood cab, added a generator and possibly other changes by 1912.
    John Sanders
    Pittsburgh_Loco_4-6-0.jpg SLSF_487_Monett_MO_1912.jpg
     
  13. Coonskin

    Coonskin Member

    Hi John:

    Thanks for the pic and drawing. I now have them saved to my SLSF_Steam/1900s folder!

    Andre
     
  14. Karl

    Karl 2008 Engineer of the Year Frisco.org Supporter

    Andre,

    I know that you are looking for TOC info, but this "modern" diagram may provide you with more dimensional data. Turn-of-the-century rosters imply that ten-wheelers with 57" drivers (and less) were classified as frt lcocomotives; locomotives with 63'+ drivers were considered psgr locomotives. The distinction was not hard and fast.


    506, nee KCFSM 146, retired Sept 1928
    507, nee KCFSM 147, retired Jan 1939
    508, nee KCFSM 148, retired June 1928
    509, nee KCFSM 149, retired May 1935
    510, nee KCFSM 150, retired Oct 1937
    511, nee KCFSM 151, retired Sept 1930
    512, nee KCFSM 152, retired April 1936
    513, nee KCFSM 153, retired Nov 1925
    514, nee KCFSM 154, retired April 1936
    515, nee KCFSM 155, retired Dec 1933

    Air Pump Exceptions:
    1-NY #6: 507-508
    2-Westinghouse, 9-1/2":509, 514

    506_515_4_6_0_ed.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 31, 2011
  15. Coonskin

    Coonskin Member

    Karl:

    Absolutely that is a help! Thank you VERY MUCH.

    Andre
     
  16. meteor910

    meteor910 2009 Engineer of the Year Staff Member Frisco.org Supporter

    Andre -

    Here are a couple of pics I found in my collection of Frisco photographs from the late Arthur B. Johnson, Frisco photographer extraordinare:

    SLSF 509, Springfield, Aug 1929
    SLSF 514, no location or date noted

    514 looks like it has a different cab than 509.

    Hope these are of help.

    Ken
     

    Attached Files:

  17. Karl

    Karl 2008 Engineer of the Year Frisco.org Supporter

    Most likely Chaffee, circa 1935-1936
     
  18. Coonskin

    Coonskin Member

    Thanks Ken! Those pics will help, too.

    Looks like these MAY have come with spoke pilot wheels, and were later retrofitted with disk? (Note the rear pilot wheels on #509.) My picture of them I posted in my original post doesn't show much about these engines... so the drawings and photos from later in their life is about all I'll have to go on.

    Andre
     

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