Question about anticlimbers

Discussion in 'GP40-2' started by gjslsffan, Jan 3, 2010.

  1. gjslsffan

    gjslsffan Staff Member Staff Member

    The Frisco GP 40's have that rounded anticlimber on the front clearly. But do they have it on the rear?
    Many models have them only on the front. I have no pictures in any books that will help.
    Pictures, advise?
    Thanks
    Tom|-|
     
  2. Sirfoldalot

    Sirfoldalot Frisco.org Supporter Frisco.org Supporter

    Re: Question about antclimbers

    Tom, From what I can see ... the rounded anticlimber was not on all GP40's. Was not on the back at all. But I am not an authority.
     
  3. Brad Slone

    Brad Slone Member Frisco.org Supporter

    Re: Question about antclimbers

    Tom,

    I am no expert, but I always thought that the jumbo anti climbers where on both ends of the units. But I could be mistaken on this detail. They where phase II GP-40-2 meaning that they where equipped with the newer anti climbers and a 88' nose as opposed to the 81' nose on the phase I. This was necessary as the FRA mandated the locomotives have "facilities" other than the walkways! They also had corrugated radiator grills where the phase I had chicken wire versions. FYI there was a phase III that had a different blower housing and the new quiet radiator fans that would be standard on the GP-50s. Sorry about TMI beyond your question, I can be long winded!

    Brad
     
  4. Sirfoldalot

    Sirfoldalot Frisco.org Supporter Frisco.org Supporter

    Re: Question about antclimbers

    Tom, Are we talking about the "porch" or the "plow"?
    I guess maybe I don't know what an anticlimber is??
     
  5. gjslsffan

    gjslsffan Staff Member Staff Member

    Re: Question about antclimbers

    Thanks Sherrel and Brad for the input and coments.

    I did get directed to the website that had the attached pictures that show there is not an inticlimber on the rear of at least 2 GP 40's. If you can, look at page 100 of "Frisco in color" and see that the tops of all the walkways on all four Geeps are painted with Black anti-skid material. Have not noticed or found that on other Frisco power either. I might have to live with the nose as is... Never have been a rivet counter, but it seems I've gotten close:eek:

    Cheers
    GJ Tom
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 4, 2010
  6. gjslsffan

    gjslsffan Staff Member Staff Member

    Re: Question about antclimbers

    Sherrel,
    The anticlimber is for lack of a better explanation, an extension on the front and or rear of the walkways. The term anticlimber means exactly what it says. Designed to keep other things ie: locomotives, cars, trucks or whatever is in front of the unit, upon impact, from climbing over the sill and wiping the nose and cab and thereby crew from the locomotive. They actually work especially on the new stuff. I could show you horrific video and proof of head-on collisions and the North American safety cab inticlimbers doing there job, the crew sometimes walking away or minimal injuries.
    But enough of that.
    In modeling, it's kind of a glaring difference to me, and the sort of thing I would change on a model.
    But I regress
    GJ Tom
     
  7. Sirfoldalot

    Sirfoldalot Frisco.org Supporter Frisco.org Supporter

    Re: Question about antclimbers

    Thanks for the info. I have so much to learn.
    I looked at hundreds of pic on one of the loco websites.
    Seems like most folks don't shoot the rear of very many units.
    At first I thought you were talking about the plow being curved, then I realized that you meant something other.
    Anyway, from all the photo's I looked at - seems like the "rounded" anticlimber is only on the front. Plz correct me if I am wrong.

    PS .. I have a GP40 that I purchased from Ken. I better go and dig it out to see if that is something I may want to change down the road.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 3, 2010
  8. Iantha_Branch

    Iantha_Branch Member

    Re: Question about antclimbers

    I too have much to learn. I had no clue what an anti climber was. Could some one show me a picture of a model with these so I know what I'm looking for.
     
  9. TAG1014

    TAG1014 Frisco.org Supporter Frisco.org Supporter

    Re: Question about antclimbers

    See the dark object between the Texas star and the coupler? That's the "buffer." The "wings" with the fluting that go out each side from the buffer is (are) the anti-climber. Should the engine strike something like an automobile, the auto would tend to "slide" up the pilot, but would be stopped by the anti-climber.

    Tom
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 4, 2010
  10. Iantha_Branch

    Iantha_Branch Member

    Re: Question about antclimbers

    Ok, i see what to look for now. thanks
     
  11. meteor910

    meteor910 2009 Engineer of the Year Staff Member Frisco.org Supporter

    Re: Question about antclimbers

    Also notice that the face of the buffer is almost always without paint - it has been rubbed off. When the couplers fully compress, as during a hard coupling, or perhaps hard braking, the buffer is what the coupled car or coupled locomotive bumps into next. That wears off the paint.

    So, when you are painting a locomotive that has a buffer plate, like a F-unit or E-unit, rub the paint off the buffer and put on a bit of rust. that's the way they always were in the real world.

    Ken
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 4, 2010
  12. FriscoCharlie

    FriscoCharlie Administrator Staff Member Administrator Frisco.org Supporter

    Re: Question about antclimbers

    What's that sign in the background? Looks like a cookskin.

    Charlie
     
  13. TAG1014

    TAG1014 Frisco.org Supporter Frisco.org Supporter

    That sign reads: NSCO. Some kind of business in Tulsa?? More of a "shield" than a coonskin. The sign below says: "The Ideal Brick Mfg. Co. Inc." This photo and several others similar, show the new Texas Special and Meteor engines at Tulsa being turned and serviced after having pulled the "Will Rogers" during the night (The "Will" was still a night train then). They were training crews in handling and servicing the diesels until the streamline cars arrived. The oil burning 4-8-4's (4500-4501-4502) were stll handling the HW Meteor.

    Tom
     
  14. Sirfoldalot

    Sirfoldalot Frisco.org Supporter Frisco.org Supporter

    NSCO could be National Supply Company. I think there was an oil field supply company by that name.....Karl?
     
  15. Karl

    Karl 2008 Engineer of the Year Frisco.org Supporter

    National Supply was located on Archer, which wasn't far from the Tulsa depot...could be?


     
  16. mark

    mark Member

    Anti-climbers have developed and generally grown in size over the years, particularly after the mid 1970s.

    Frisco's early switch engines (VO-1000, DS-4-4-1000, S-4, NW-2, SW-7, SW-9, GE-44 ton, GE 45 ton, H-10-44, H-12-44) generally did not have anti-climbers. This is due to the low speeds at which this type unit generally operated. The low speed operation reduced the potential for a vehicle to be lifted above the pilot at a grade crossing accident.

    With the introduction to the Frisco of the EMD SW-1500 model, and its higher speeds, anti-climbers were introduced on the switcher fleet. An example of the "small standard" anti-climber is visible in this photo of the front of SLSF 329. The anti-climber is the white ">" shaped protrusion below the multiple unit (MU) drop step, MU electrical cable receptacle box and between the outer two vertical handrail stantions. Please see http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/slsf/slsf0329gea.jpg.

    Full car body type units (E-7, E-8, F-3, F-7, FP-7, FA-1) with anti-climbers were addressed in an earlier post by Tom Galbraith. Early road switchers (GP-7, RS-1, RS-2), like early switchers, generally lacked anti-climbers.

    With the introduction of the EMD GP-35 and GE U-25-B units to the Frisco, all subsequent four axle and the EMD SD-45 locomotives had anti-climbers as standard equipment. An example of a typical "small standard" anti-climber on a road switcher is shown on SLSF 400. Like the example of the SW-1500 above, the anti-climber is a wedge shaped ">" under the MU drop step, MU electrical cable receptacle box and between the outer most vertical handrail stantions. Please see SLSF 400 http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/slsf/slsf400aga.jpg

    In 1977 EMD introduced a longer standard front hood length of 88" (formerly 81"). The overall frame length remained constant, and as a result, a new more massive, larger deep "v" shaped anti-climber was introduced. The first example on the Frisco was introduced with the EMD GP-15. Note in the photograph of SLSF 105 the deep "v" shaped anti-climber and lack of drop step. With this deep style anti-climber, a drop step was no longer needed to bridge the gap between coupled units. Please see http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/slsf/slsf105abp.jpg

    An interesting note on the Frisco's EMD SD-40-2 and SD-38-2 units is that they lacked anti-climbers. The assignment of the SD-38-2 units as hump yard switchers might help explain the absence of this feature. However, when the SD-40-2 units were introduced, EMD was producing similar units for other railroads with large extended anti-climbers. One speculates that the railroad saw the extended "front porch" distance of the SD units as a sufficient substitute for the anti-climber.

    Additional crew protection is afforded by other anti-collision engineering including anti-climber impalement from couplers, deflection using rounded, curved or "v" shaped hoods, and energy absorption using the mass of sandboxes, internal anti collision bracing and the hood structure.

    Hope this helps.

    Thanks!

    Mark
     

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