Chipped paint and oil paint weathering part 2

Discussion in 'Modeling Tips' started by modeltruckshop, Mar 13, 2018.

  1. modeltruckshop

    modeltruckshop Member Frisco.org Supporter

    Once the body color is dry it is time to chip it off. The sooner it is chipped the easier it is to chip where you want. When I am doing this I wait until I have time to chipping fluid and outer color in one night and still have time to chip it. With the acrylic paint 30 minutes is plenty of cure time. While waiting soak some toothpicks and a stiff bristle brush in water.
    When it is time to chip put a little water over the entire piece. After a few seconds the chipping fluid reacts. It will not bubble or peel etc.... but it will be soft enough to chip away. For bigger areas the stiff bristle brush can be rubbed on the parts to remove more paint.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    On the parts above I exaggerated it just to show the effects. Later I just sanded and reshot the part for the finished product. After you are happy with the chipping let the parts dry. Depending on what you are modeling you mat be done. For my project I wanted the paint to look like the Texas sun had really burnt it and years of wear taken its toll. To do this wet sand the parts with 800 grit wet dry sand paper. Rub gently until you like the look. With the chipping fluid base it will allow the color to sand off very easy. So be careful, start lightly and apply more pressure to get the look you want.
    [​IMG]
    Here is a couple shots of chipped areas and the look is pretty realistic I think.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    After all that and you are happy with it another couple coats of Dulcoat will protect all your work. I will add some oil tips next. Thanks
     

Share This Page