Kennett, MO

Discussion in 'Depots G-P' started by timothy, Jun 18, 2003.

  1. timothy

    timothy Guest

    Kennett, MO
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 24, 2006
    mountaincreekar likes this.
  2. timothy

    timothy Guest

    Kennett, MO
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 22, 2005
    mountaincreekar likes this.
  3. bootheel

    bootheel Member

    Re: Depots G-P

    The Kennett Depot is very similar to one at Caruthersville. It was torn down in the early 90's to make way for a Veterans Park. Anyone have Floor plans or a sell a kit (HO) of this depot.
     
    mountaincreekar likes this.
  4. First Kennett Mo Station, built by Louis Houck on his St. Louis, Kennett and Southeastern Railroad, purchased by the Frisco.

    FM
     

    Attached Files:

    mountaincreekar likes this.
  5. railroadguy65

    railroadguy65 Member

    :) Kennett, MO Station - 1922 Sanborn map
     

    Attached Files:

    mountaincreekar likes this.
  6. klrwhizkid

    klrwhizkid Administrator Staff Member Administrator Frisco.org Supporter

    From Richard Crabtree on Frisco Rails Across Missouri;
    Here we are in Kennett, Missouri and we have a couple of the rail lines that serviced the area - The Frisco and the St. Louis, Kennett and Southeastern Railroad.
    Photo 1) The Original Frisco Depot in Kennett, Missouri around 1900.
    Photo 2) At the Frisco Depot in Kennett, Missouri in 1903. The Drummers Association was heading to Farmington, Missouri
    Photo 3) The Frisco Depot at Kennett, Missouri built in 1914 that replaced the original one that burned in 1913.
    Photo 4) Blueprint for the 1914 Frisco Depot in Kennett, Missouri ~ MSU Digital Collection
    Photo 5) 1919 Sanborn Map for Kennett, Missouri showing the The Frisco and the St. Louis, Kennett and Southeastern Railroad Depots.
    Photo 6) The St. Louis, Kennett and Southeastern Railroad Depot.
    Click here for current view
    https://www.google.com/maps/@36.23664,-90.0524925,3a,75y,192.46h,83.19t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sHT0LePyxL1rgFSdB12sFVw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656
    Frisco Depot in Kennett, Missouri around 1900..jpg Kennett, Missouri 1903. Drummers Association.jpg risco Depot at Kennett, Missouri built in 1914.jpg Kennett Mo 1914 Depot Plan.jpg 1919 Sanborn Map for Kennett, Missouri.jpg St. Louis, Kennett and Southeastern Railroad Depot Kennett, Mo.jpg
     
    mountaincreekar and rjthomas909 like this.
  7. timothy_cannon

    timothy_cannon Member Frisco.org Supporter


    From what I've been told over the years..........
    Photo 1. Originally Houck's St. Louis, Kennett and Southeastern Railroad Depot. Note the stone design Houck used. Later bought by the Frisco.
    Photo 6. Butler County RR depot in Kennett.

    BCRR liked the 2 story depot. Here is a photo of the BCRR depot at Broseley, Mo. My grandfather Byrd was from there. Also another Frisco Kennett depot pic.

    p01102.jpg F s Kennett.jpg
     
  8. yardmaster

    yardmaster Administrator Staff Member Administrator Frisco.org Supporter

    Tim, the Brosely photo is a dandy. That Bull Moose(?) alongside has some rather unique windows. Reminds me a bit of the porthole look on some of the streamlined Firefly equipment.

    The Caruthersville depot on the other end of the Caruthersville Branch is virtually identical to the Kennett depot, down to the Coonskin light brackets on the corners.

    http://www.frisco.org/shipit/index.php?threads/caruthersville-mo.389/#post-3066
     
  9. pensive

    pensive Member Frisco.org Supporter

    I didn't realize that Missouri had segregated stations.

    Rich
     
  10. klrwhizkid

    klrwhizkid Administrator Staff Member Administrator Frisco.org Supporter

    It depended on location; the further south the more the likelihood.
     
    pensive likes this.
  11. meteor910

    meteor910 2009 Engineer of the Year Staff Member Frisco.org Supporter

    Missouri was entered into the US as a slave state, 1821. The "Missouri Compromise" included Maine, who entered as a free state, 1820. Kept things even I guess. As a native Missourian (St Louis), I'm not sure the entire state was pro-slave, at least I hope not.

    K
     
    mountaincreekar likes this.
  12. Karl

    Karl 2008 Engineer of the Year Frisco.org Supporter


    The Butler County Railroad number 15, a McKeen motor car, was acquired during 1914. The car was originally purchased by the Jamestown, Westfield, and Northwestern RR. It was repossessed by McKeen, and sold to the Butler County RR. The car began service on the BC RR on April 26, 1914. After the arrival of a new steam locomotive from Baldwin, and two new passenger cars, the McKeen was withdrawn from service August 4, 1916. It was ultimately retired circa 1923, and it never appeared on the Frisco roster. Locals gave the car the moniker of “Missouri Mule”.
    The McKeen cars were notable for their porthole windows, knife-edged prow, and their boat-tail rear. The cars use a mechanical drive from a gasoline engine, which was mounted on the lead truck. The prime mover pivoted as the truck did when moving through curves. Since only one axle was powered, the cars had adhesion problems, and their prime movers suffered from reliability issues. The BC RR also bought a McKeen trailer, number 33, which did survive until the Frisco’s acquisition of the BC RR during 1927. Number 33 underwent several changes on the Frisco which requires a thread of its own.
    The BC RR also operated an unusual steam-powered “motor car", which was built by the Unit Ry Car Company and which had a Laconia Car Company car-body. When one hears the Unit Ry Car Company, one thinks Stanley Steamer.
     
    Ozarktraveler and yardmaster like this.
  13. frisco1522

    frisco1522 Staff Member Staff Member

    I regret to this day that I didn't try and get a couple of those coonskin light brackets when they tore down Tower Grove station.
     
    Ozarktraveler likes this.
  14. meteor910

    meteor910 2009 Engineer of the Year Staff Member Frisco.org Supporter

    Don - Do you think somebody else might have gotten them, or were they likely thrown into the junk pile with the rest of the rubble?
    K
     

Share This Page