White River Line

Discussion in 'Freelance' started by dboone74, Mar 2, 2021.

  1. klrwhizkid

    klrwhizkid Administrator Staff Member Administrator Frisco.org Supporter

    You can make a tool that will make installing rail joiners much easier, using a short section of rail and a small wood block. I used a scrap of poplar and used my hobby band saw to cut grips in each side. The section of rail is driven into a hole drilled in the end of the wood block near the bottom of the block. Then the exposed end of the rail is filed smooth and the foot tapered slightly near the end to allow a joiner to be slid on relatively easily.

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  2. dboone74

    dboone74 Member

    Fantastic! I will add this to my to do list.
     
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  3. dboone74

    dboone74 Member

    Here is the latest video. Thanks for watching everyone!
     
  4. klrwhizkid

    klrwhizkid Administrator Staff Member Administrator Frisco.org Supporter

    Another well done video, Drew!
     
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  5. dboone74

    dboone74 Member

    Thanks, Keith!
     
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  6. dboone74

    dboone74 Member

    Here is the newest video. I'm not sure I'm doing this right, but I think it should work.
     
  7. Jim James

    Jim James Staff Member Staff Member

    That’s above my pay grade! Looking very professional with a museum quality feel to it.
     
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  8. dboone74

    dboone74 Member

    Very kind, Jim. Makes me wonder how much museums pay for this kind of work.
     
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  9. dboone74

    dboone74 Member

    I'm thinking about adding some magnets for Kadee couplers. Anyone have any advice on this?
     
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  10. klrwhizkid

    klrwhizkid Administrator Staff Member Administrator Frisco.org Supporter

    Don't. Nearly everyone that has done so, has regretted it. They are never in the exact right place and under low speed operations, they tend to cause uncoupling at inopportune times.
     
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  11. klrwhizkid

    klrwhizkid Administrator Staff Member Administrator Frisco.org Supporter

    Look for a putty knife that has serrations at the end to make spreading the caulk easier. They are most often found with tile installations tools. Ace Hardware or Home Depot has plastic ones that I narrow to track width. The caulk comes off of them easily when cured.
    When using Dynaflex 230 to lay track or roadbed, start with about an 1/8" bead and spread with the serrated knife. The caulk will go further and still get the job done, and it will be easier to remove roadbed or track if you find you have to change the track layout.
     
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  12. gstout

    gstout Member Frisco.org Supporter

    Well, yeah, that's true, but I have about 100 passenger cars and they all have diaphragms. Trying to poke an uncoupling device into that space doesn't work very well, so at least in Union Station, it's got to be magnets.

    GS
     
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  13. gjslsffan

    gjslsffan Staff Member Staff Member

    Not having a fleet of diaphragm equipped cars. I have experienced the undesired uncoupling issues with permanent mounted uncoupling magnets as well.
    If you want a magnetic uncoupling tool here is one that works pretty good https://rixproducts.com/product/rix-uncoupling-tool-ho/ I have used them. And they work OK. The issue with permanent magnets is they are always there, and always doing their job.
     
  14. gstout

    gstout Member Frisco.org Supporter

    You are correct. Life is about compromise.

    GS
     
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