Unique Frisco Features of Steam Locomotives

Discussion in 'HO Steam Locomotive General' started by SAFN SAAP, May 24, 2011.

  1. SAFN SAAP

    SAFN SAAP Member

    Hi Y'all,

    In trying to model accuracy on the Frisco steam locomotives, I've decided to open up this thread, concerning detail parts, either brass or plastic that could help.

    I know that Frisco favored the NY Style of Compound Pumps.

    What type of headlights and stacks did the Frisco use?

    If you have the answers or have information or questions about any part, please post up. This thread will help those who wish to modify steamers to be like Frisco units.

    Thanks!

    Manny
     
  2. SAFN SAAP

    SAFN SAAP Member

    Does this stack look or resemble Frisco's? Is it too tall? What about the taper?

    Thanks,

    Manny



    potential stack.JPG
     
  3. Karl

    Karl 2008 Engineer of the Year Frisco.org Supporter

    I think that an argument can be made that until the Frisco emerged from receivership during 1916, its steam locomotives did not possess much in the way of family look. (Others might argue for the date of the acquisition of the Gulf Road, 1900-1901.) Regardless, preceding one of those dates, locomotives from various antecedent roads comprised the roster, so a variety looks (cabs, windows, stacks, domes, compressors, etc) was evident. Given your modeling era, I don't think that I would sweat the variation in those details too much. I would focus on the following things. The Frisco did several things that gave its disparate-looking locomotives a family look. The Frisco used a cast Pyle-National headlamps, which were mounted on a Frisco coonskin-bearing bracket. The headlight was placed slightly above the center of the smokebox door. I'd also mount the bell at the top of the smokebox door; some of the early Frisco locomotives had this done. It was a standard location on the newer locomotives. The Frisco was one of the few roads to use smoke density lamps on the stack. It's rare that one sees a Frisco locomotive without one. I'd round out the front-end with a footboard and boiler tube pilot. Your Texas setting would allow for oil burning locomotives, so add oil bunkers to your tenders. A Frisco doghouse on the tender would further tighten the family look. I would also consider using sheet brass or styrene to "square-up" arched cab windows or cover the forward side-windows on cabs that had the "full-window" treatment.
     
  4. SAFN SAAP

    SAFN SAAP Member

    Thanks Karl. That is an excellent addition to this thread. I hope that others will chime in. I appreciate the tips towards my layout, but remember that this thread is to cover all periods and locals of the Frisco. Thanks again for the contribution!
     
  5. TAG1014

    TAG1014 Frisco.org Supporter Frisco.org Supporter

    Weren't the headlights mounted slightly below the smokebox centers?? I'm thinking of the 1000's, 1500's, 43-44-4500's (Although I have seen a photo of a 1600 with a very high mounted headlight).

    Tom
     
  6. Karl

    Karl 2008 Engineer of the Year Frisco.org Supporter

    The context of my remarks were directed at the older power, e.g., 216 on p91 of Collias. Otherwise, the headlight was placed on center of the smokebox front.
     
  7. Sirfoldalot

    Sirfoldalot Frisco.org Supporter Frisco.org Supporter

    Tom, I think that the headlights were centered on the smokebox door, which would place the mounting bracket slightly below center. (if this is what you are referring too)
     
  8. meteor910

    meteor910 2009 Engineer of the Year Staff Member Frisco.org Supporter

    Except for SLSF 1506, which had an odd-looking higher mounting of the headlight & bracket on the smokebox door. Perhaps Don, Gordon or others can remind us of why that was.

    Ken
     
  9. TAG1014

    TAG1014 Frisco.org Supporter Frisco.org Supporter

    I was just visualizing the 1500's and also 4500's (4502, for example) where the bracket is below center and the headlight itself is (slightly) below center. But there are others where the headlight is mounted differently. Manny and Karl were speaking of earlier engines.

    Tom
     
  10. renapper

    renapper Passed away March 8, 2013

    The headlight used most on the Frisco Steam was the Pyle-National with number board wings mounted on the Coonskin Number board bracket, but not all classes used the coonskin bracket, not even all locomotives within a class used it. You have to check a picture of the locomotive you want to model to be sure.
     
  11. SAFN SAAP

    SAFN SAAP Member

    Does anyone have information on non-Delta style trailing trucks, such as if they were the Hodgekins style or USRA? Also, does anyone out there make the short style cabs commonly found on Frisco steamers or is that going to be a modification to design?

    Thanks,

    Manny
     
  12. frisco1522

    frisco1522 Staff Member Staff Member

    If you watch ebay under HO brass models, a seller named carshopper sells some nice castings for the non delta trucks like the 1040-1059 used.
     
  13. renapper

    renapper Passed away March 8, 2013

    Many of the steam locomotives were built with the Hodgekins style trailing truck or USRA Style, but apparently the Friscodid not like it very much, and in allmost all cases replaced it with the prefered Delta trailig truck which in many cases included a booster engine.
     
  14. SAFN SAAP

    SAFN SAAP Member

    Thank you for that update Richard. I'm not a big fan of the Delta's, but I will use them on the 2-8-2's I will be building. All my Pacific's will get either Cal Scale's USRA or Precision Scale Hodgekins. I guess in order to use the Bachmann Lt. Mountain 4-8-2's, then I will need to switch the USRA's out as well and add a Delta. NO biggie. Thanks for your addition to this thread!

    Let's keep the data flowing! Bells, whistles, anything unique to the Frisco, please feel free to add!

    Manny
     
  15. Karl

    Karl 2008 Engineer of the Year Frisco.org Supporter

    I believe that you mean "Hodges" which was the Baldwin developed trailer, circa 1909-1910. The Cole-Scoville trailer was the Alco trailer, which it developed circa 1903. The USRA standardized the use of the various appliances and appurtenances, and with regard to the trailer it opted for the following:
    Mikado Light, Hodges; Mikado Heavy, Cole. For all other USRA types, the government specified the Cole trailer. The cast Delta trailer was was developed circa 1916, but it suffered from lateral centering problems; it was not chosen by the USRA. After the war, the stability problems were resolved. Since it was a single cast piece, it provided a better frame for the trailing wheel, and it provided a solid foundation on which to mount a booster engine.
     

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