Rosedale, KS Scale House & Yard Office (Imagineered)

Discussion in 'Yard Offices' started by Karl, Apr 26, 2016.

  1. Karl

    Karl 2008 Engineer of the Year Frisco.org Supporter

    The Northern Division B&B inventory provides a very nice record of the structures, which were located on the division. The inventory provides the basic dimensions and a rudimentary “bill of material”, but for the most part, it leaves us guessing with regard to the precise placement of almost everything related to the structure.

    The Frisco’s Rosedale combination scale house – yard office provides an interesting challenge. Three of the windows fit nicely in the bay window of the scale house side of the building. The rest of the windows are placed as to optimize lighting. Structures, which were built during an era ignorant of electric lighting, required large windows, which were placed high on the walls. Transoms, which were placed above doors, were a necessity. Tall windows required high ceilings. The high ceilings give the structure a top-heavy look. I confess that the two sashes, which I assume to be transoms, do appear to be a bit large. They could easily be combined to serve as another window, but that combination just didn’t fit on any of the elevations. One can make a case that the doors would on any of the four walls. The office used drop siding, but the inventory doesn’t specify the size of the lumber siding; I opted for 6” +/- drop siding.

    The Rosedale scale house – yard office would make a nice model project. Its dual function makes it an excellent candidate for a small model yard, and it could easily be compressed further to fit the smallest of spaces. The B&B record doesn’t provide a retirement date, but I suspect that it survived until the yard betterments, which were implemented during 1954.

    Until July 1925, trains originated and terminated at the Frisco's Liberty Yard, aka, 19th Street Yard. At 8 PM, July 5, 1925 the Frisco switched operations. Rosedale became the outbound yard and the 19th Street Yard became the inbound yard. Crews boarded their power and caboose at 19th Street, and took them to Rosedale, where they tacked-on the caboose and coupled the power onto the awaiting train.
     

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    Last edited: Apr 27, 2016
  2. klrwhizkid

    klrwhizkid Administrator Staff Member Administrator Frisco.org Supporter

    Nicely done, Karl. Thanks for sharing.
     
    Sirfoldalot and Karl like this.
  3. yardmaster

    yardmaster Administrator Staff Member Administrator Frisco.org Supporter

    It all makes sense, now. I've always thought that old depots looked rather out of whack, not to mention the one-room school house replica on the grounds of my place of employment. I'm ashamed that I never really gave a lot of critical thought to why it had a ceiling so very high, other than it would have taken the old wood stove working overtime to heat all of that space.

    Even though I'm not modeling Rosedale per se in my currently available land grant, I might have to find a way to include this. Thanks very much, Karl.

    Best Regards,
     

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