How do you model buildings?

Discussion in 'Structures' started by trainchaser007, Nov 14, 2009.

  1. trainchaser007

    trainchaser007 Passed away September 22, 2017

    4.5 more hours tonight. Sides fabricated and glued. STANDING! Total work time as of 10:30pm, 1/25/13 = 12.5 hrs. Not MMR material but I thinks it's coming along nicely for this "1st timer." (Jim, if you see this post, I'll PM you tommorrow. I barely kept my eyes open long enough to get this photo posted tonight.)
    SANY0351.JPG Photo161.jpg
     
  2. Jim James

    Jim James Staff Member Staff Member

    That's coming together quickly and is already recognizable. Keep the momentum going!
     
  3. trainchaser007

    trainchaser007 Passed away September 22, 2017

    How about some triangles made out of foam board?
     
  4. yardmaster

    yardmaster Administrator Staff Member Administrator Frisco.org Supporter

    Sounds like a reasonably good idea to me. What will you use for the sub-roof? Any sort of paper-based roof decking, such as illustration board or other heavy cardstock, would probably adhere to the foam kor rafters with white glue, wood glue or a hot glue gun.

    Best Regards,
     
  5. Jim James

    Jim James Staff Member Staff Member

    You could also glue some stingers underneath the roof lengthwise and do away with the triangle pieces altogether. That's just what I would do and have done. Glue a dowel or wood strip between the two peaks to keep it in shape and hang the roof peak from that. Like a support beam.
     
  6. Jim James

    Jim James Staff Member Staff Member

    Something like this works for me.
    [​IMG]
     
  7. trainchaser007

    trainchaser007 Passed away September 22, 2017

    I had thought of that "dowel between the two peaks" idea but I wasn't sure if the plastic would sag between the dowel and wall. I may try that with a foam board sub roof. Thanks.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 28, 2013
  8. Jim James

    Jim James Staff Member Staff Member

    I use thick square wood sticks from Hobby Lobby for the top stringer. I glue them with super glue at an angle to form the top peak and they're butted right up to the end peaks. No sag. Brace the underside of the roof. You won't see it so it can be ugly.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 28, 2013
  9. Oldguy

    Oldguy Member Frisco.org Supporter

    If I may suggest - add some horizontal bracing along the long wall sections (assuming that you won't be detailing the interior). And considering the length of the building, you may want to add some front to back bracing to stiffen it up for handling purposes.

    It looks like the roofing is corrugated metal with some rafter tails showing. So one could use either a foam core subroofing, covered by Campbell-like metal or just plastic corugated sheet. Which ever way you go, I would think some bracing, at least half-way up the roof peaks would supply proper roof covering support. I would also suggest adding a dark painted second floor (could just be cardboard), to prevent seeing through the windows down to the main floor from second floor windows.
     
  10. trainchaser007

    trainchaser007 Passed away September 22, 2017

    I like all of the bracing ideas. It sounds like you guys are trying to give me tips on how to prevent natural warping of the plastic brick sheets later on. A second floor would help keep things square. Perhaps 3 levels out of foam board - floor, 2nd floor & ceiling, would help keep things square at the bottom, middle and top which would also perhaps help to prevent joints from popping loose. I have ordered some more brick sheets to make the back wall. Something tells me to get the walls completed before moving onto the roof in spite of the fact that I already have the materials for the roof and that I am itching to get back to working on the building. I just think it would be better/easier to get the walls up first. My water tower kit assembly and locomotive repair projects and given me something to do in the mean time.
     
  11. renapper

    renapper Passed away March 8, 2013

    If you use .040" styrene as a sub roof and then .040" styrene shingle material, and use a1/8" square piece of styrene at the roof peak, it will not warp. Wood has grain and will warp but styrene has no grain and will not warp. That is why I use styrene for everything including what I want to look like wood.
     
  12. Jim James

    Jim James Staff Member Staff Member

    Very very true. I use styrene for the subroofs on all my structures. Good point, Richard.
     
  13. trainchaser007

    trainchaser007 Passed away September 22, 2017

    Bracing for "handling purpose," not warping. Gotcha. I missed that concept somehow earlier today.
     
  14. trainchaser007

    trainchaser007 Passed away September 22, 2017

    After 35 total hrs. on this project over 15 days, as of this post submitted at 10:00pm 2/6/13, all I have to say is... I HATE PARAPETS!!! I mean I REALLY HATE them. 3 more things to do: Apply letters, down spouts, and square dowels on the inside to straighten out the walls. I will have 36-37 hours by then.
    It is definitely a far cry from greatness, but for my first scratch build ever, considering it has been a trial and error experience all the way, I am pleased with the overall outcome. Don't count rivets, or in this case bricks. I never intended to build a professional quality, highly detailed, 1:87 exact scale replica with my limited knowledge and ability. My intentions were to have our local, old Sulligent Cotton Oil Company brick building on my layout and have it look decent. The important things to me are that I am happy, locals will be impressed, and most importantly, I have learned a lot along the way. I would like to thank everyone who replied to this thread. I couldn't have done it without you. It was clearly documented on this thread early on that I didn't know where to start before you all helped me. I sincerely appreciate all of your help and encouragement! I also want to thank my wife and children for tolerating my obsession for the last 2 weeks.

    If you're wondering why these pics were taken on my tool box outside... paint fumes.
    SANY0059.JPG Photo167.jpg SANY0351.JPG Photo166.jpg
     
  15. Jim James

    Jim James Staff Member Staff Member

    Now that is one fine example of modeling. I think it looks great and you have every right to be proud of yourself. Impressive.
     
  16. yardmaster

    yardmaster Administrator Staff Member Administrator Frisco.org Supporter

    Excellent job. The work on the firewalls that project above the roofline are especially nice!

    Best Regards,
     
  17. TAG1014

    TAG1014 Frisco.org Supporter Frisco.org Supporter

    Curious Brandon--What are you planning for the faded sign painted on the building? I think I have seen a model magazine article covering that, but I can't recall the magazine or date. OR, are you going to model the sign more freshly painted?

    Thanks, Tom G.
     
  18. klrwhizkid

    klrwhizkid Administrator Staff Member Administrator Frisco.org Supporter

    Brandon, you can build a structure for my layout anytime - great work. You can see that patience and perseverence counts!
     
  19. Oldguy

    Oldguy Member Frisco.org Supporter

    I think you nailed it big time!!! Anyone who may have seen it in person will immediately recognize what you built, and that is what's important. Not that it was built brick-for-brick as the original.
     
  20. Sirfoldalot

    Sirfoldalot Frisco.org Supporter Frisco.org Supporter

    Very, VERY nicely done. Your many hours of work have paid off!
    Nothing short of great.
     

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