1502 in 1929

Discussion in '1500 Class Mountains' started by frisco1522, Mar 22, 2006.

  1. frisco1522

    frisco1522 Staff Member Staff Member

    Here's a nice shot of the 1502 sitting in the evening sun at St. Louis Union Station ready to leave with No. 1, The Texas Special, back in 1929.
    Note the striping on the tender, a little different and more elaborate rendition that what the engines eventually had. Also note the Volatone air horns on the cab roof, right over the engineer's head. Wonder whose idea that was?
    Nice fishbelly Frisco RPO in back of the engine.
     

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  2. Karl

    Karl 2008 Engineer of the Year Frisco.org Supporter

    Speaking of Volatone Whistles

    Several months ago while perusing the Springfield Library's digital collection of the Frisco Employee's Magazines, I happened across this article (2/28) about the Volitone(sic) Horn. Apparently the placement of choice for this horn was on the cab roof, because several subsequent articles about locomotive rebuilding projects specifically state that the Volatones were moved to the "smoke arch". For example, see p16 of the Sept. 1931 issue which discusses the rebuilding of the 1061.

    As a side note, the Springfield North Side Jazz Band called itself the Volatones.

    I don't why the application of the Volatones was discontinued or why they were ultimately removed. No doubt the higher cost of the Volatone vs a steam whistle played a part. My father never had nice comments about the horn.
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 23, 2006
  3. AmtrakBob

    AmtrakBob Member

    Nice photo of the 1502; interesting to note a passenger engine with a rear sand delivery pipe on the #2 driver. Seems odd to me for a passenger steam engine to have this feature unless it was considered a dual service engine. Were these engines designated "dual service" (feight/passenger)?

    Bob Campbell
    Naperville, IL
     
  4. Karl

    Karl 2008 Engineer of the Year Frisco.org Supporter

    The Mighty Have Fallen

    Although she still retains the gold, Doric striping (albeit slightly less fancy than 1929) for which the Frisco is well known, we see the 1502 in an entirely different setting than Don's image depicts. The negative jacket tells us that we have a shot of the 1502 taken on 5/2/36 in Hoxie, AR. However, details on the image don't square with that date and place. Behind the tender we can see a turntable; the Frisco didn't have one in Hoxie. The tender sports, of all things, a doghouse. In 1936, this was heresy. There is also a subtle clue; the bell is grimy, and the boiler jacket needs to be wiped. The Frisco wouldn't let her pull The Texas Special, The Kansas City-Florida Special, or The Meteor in such a state. Finally, the clue that sheds the most light on the date and place of this picture are the train indicator boards, which are mounted behind the stack. During the summer of 1948, the Texas & New Orleans leased the 1501, 1502, 1514, and the 1521. No doubt, this view depicts the 1502 on foreign rails during the summer of 1948. We see her here as she awaits her next freight (?) call for her temporary master. Knowing Texas summers as I do, it must have been a hot, muggy day. She is many miles away and many days away from 1929, St Louis, and the Texas Special
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 14, 2009
  5. frisco1522

    frisco1522 Staff Member Staff Member

    You nailed it, the 1502 is indeed on lease to the T&NO.
    Several years ago I stopped at the Georgetown Loop RR and was talking with the engineer on the train, who was retired from Denison on the T&NO and he brought up the subject of the leased engines, and how much they liked the shotgun exhaust of the 1500s and how you could hear them all over town when they started a train. He said they were very well liked there.
     
  6. Re: Speaking of Volatone Whistles


    A Photo of the Horns that karl was speaking of from FEM 1928

    FM
     

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  7. frisco1522

    frisco1522 Staff Member Staff Member

    I had never seen that location for the horns before. The photos I've seen show them either mounted on the cab roof (ugh) or all 4 mounted on the right side of the smokebox. Perhaps this was another experimental location. I just know the cab roof mounting right over the engineer's head was popular with the engine crew.
    1510 shows what seemed to be the preferable location.
     

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