HWB

Kato SD45's and Athearn Genesis F7's

Kato SD45's and Athearn Genesis F7's
HWB, May 4, 2009
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    • Randy Lockett
      As a brakeman and Xtra Conductor working the Eastern Div. out of Lindenwood Yards (1968-74), sometimes our engine consists looked like this. We would have the GM's 900 series engine, an old "covered waggon" in the middle and another 900 series on the end, or what ever that they had available (That wasn't in the engine shop).

      My favorite engine was our newest, the 900's. Latest from GM. Powerful and a good puller for the fright that we pulled. From the lead out of Viburnum (St. Jo Lead Co.), via Cuba, Mo. to the tri-levels out of Chrysler Assy. plant in Fenton. The 437 (Westbound) was our "Hot shot" train. We generally had a "High Green" all the way West. We disembarked at Newberg for our turn-around.

      Even though we were a mile long and approx 4500 tons of laden frieght, those engines would scoot. Even though we were regulated to go no more than 50 MPH, our engineers usually ran 60 to 65. The Superentendents usually looked the other way to that, as they liked to get the frieght delivered on schedule. That was pretty fast for the rolling hills of Missouri. We lived up to our Motto. "Frisco Fast Freight"

      You have modeled the engines and cars very accurately. Kudos to you.

      Randy Lockett
      AKA Lockett the Rocket

      (That handle comes from the yard master and Tower man in my switching days. I was always getting the work done in short order so we could go on "spot" or get an early quit for getting my work done early and go home. The union rep did not like that. He said that I was giving them too much. Actually, I was wrecking their notion that the work took a long time to do. But I did it safely and had no accidents.)
    • JohnFoster
      I live in kc worked out of 19th st as fireman then as engr. that sound so like kc working.yard and road work.Some times their was a 900-F9b unit 900.at the time didn"t pay that much attention . Now that I"m a ho wish talken pictures.i
    • Shooshie
      Randy said: "That handle comes from the yard master and Tower man in my switching days. I was always getting the work done in short order so we could go on "spot" or get an early quit for getting my work done early and go home. The union rep did not like that. He said that I was giving them too much. Actually, I was wrecking their notion that the work took a long time to do. But I did it safely and had no accidents."

      That reminds me of my training and orientation during my first days on the railroad as a brakeman/switchman. I was 18, and was a distance runner in track & field. I actually loved to run, so anytime I had to look up and down a train for a blown hose or dragging wheel or whatever -- even to throw a switch, I wanted to run the distance. Well, you can imagine how I got shook down by the powers that be. They said "we don't run here." I said "oh, that's ok. I don't mind. I enjoy it, and I can do it safely." Someone thumped my chest and barked like a bulldog: "kid, this ain't about what you want. We have a rule; we don't run, and that means you. Get it?" I still ran when nobody was looking, but I got it. Hoo-boy… I got it.

      Shooshie
    • fireball_magee
      Love the stories!! I had to tell a new switchman that the engineers uhhh 2 am rulebook review yeah thats it, was sacred! No running no fast walking and check every car! When it comes to running we cant make up time anymore,but I would have loved the days of "make time orders" and just running her to get the freight moved! I am blessed that I was trained by some old heads who would tell me stories of trainmasters lowering their radar guns when the realized just what train was coming at them.Our job is to move freight! Not sit here.
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  • Album:
    Frisco models
    Uploaded By:
    HWB
    Date:
    May 4, 2009
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